Bath & Body

Woman posing with hair

Skincare : Cosmetics and Transdermal Absorption

If you wouldn’t eat it, why put it on your skin? It’s widely accepted that ingesting chemicals is bad for our health, but what about transdermal penetration? The fact is, what we put on our skin can also impact our health.

3 Reasons Perfume Stinks for Your Health

3 Reasons Perfume Stinks for Your Health

Perfume has become a industrial, virtually plant-free affair, far removed from its nature-bound beginnings. Modern day perfumes and fragrances, be they the ones you spray on, shampoo into your skin or moisturize post-shower, have morphed into vehicles that deliver numerous petroleum-based synthetic toxins into our bodies, making most scents little more than ugly subverters of health, wrapped in pretty packaging.

New Year, New Skin: How To Refresh Your Beauty Habits For 2018

New Year, New Skin: How To Refresh Your Beauty Habits For 2018

Deborah Burnes, natural beauty expert, reminds us: our bodies are great communicators, but it’s up to us to listen to the messages. They can be physical or emotional and range from obvious to subtle. Symptoms can come and go, change, or be persistent. However, once we learn what to look for, we have the power to be proactive and lessen the stress on our bodies. 

Get An All-Over Glow With Dry Brushing

Get An All-Over Glow With Dry Brushing

The skin is the body’s largest organ and is often called "the third kidney" because of its importance in the body’s process of detoxification. Daily your body regenerates new skin cells leaving many of the dead ones still on the body. The brushing of the skin helps the skin regenerate more efficiently allowing the load on the kidney and liver to lessen.

Bar of Soap

Is a “Clean” Bar of Soap Too Much to Ask?

As United States citizens, we are considered innocent until proven guilty. This is a comfort we are guaranteed, and as a country we value our rights. Is this right something that should be given across the board—not just for citizens, but for industries as well? When it comes to consumer goods and ingredients, should suppliers enjoy the same luxury? Currently, suppliers and manufacturers of cosmetic ingredients in the U.S. do; this is in contrast with other countries that have more stringent premarket regulations. Since these manufacturers of ingredients and products do not have to prove their safety, the burden falls on consumers to determine toxic from safe, right from wrong, good from bad. Without sufficient information and education, we have to be our own advocates for our health and well-being.

Label Claims

What the Label Claims on Cosmetics Really Mean?

When it comes to cosmetics, similar to packaged food, we see labels like “natural” and “organic” that make us think it’s the healthiest option. Surprisingly, these labels legally mean nothing. Due to major loopholes in federal law, cosmetics can be labeled “natural,” “organic,” “green,” “non-toxic,” and nearly any other word that comes to mind without containing ingredients that accurately meet those descriptions. Here’s the “definition” of these terms so you know when you are shopping cosmetics.

Perfumes

99 Reasons to Stop Wearing Artificial Fragrances and Perfume

We have a body odor problem in this country. But it’s not what you probably think. Yes, some of us stink pretty badly (thanks, Standard American Diet), but that’s not the problem. The issue is our relentless pursuit to cover up our body odor with artificial fragrances and perfumes.Somewhere down the line we decided that detergents and chemicals smell more pleasant than our armpits. We traded in natural botanicals for hazardous materials. We let celebrities sell us perfumes because we think that’s what they must smell like all the time, and if we use their perfume, we’ll smell like a celebrity too.

Skin Care

“Sodium Lauryl Sulfate from Coconut” – Is It Safer?

As a safe cosmetics advocate and founder of CV Skinlabs, I’m often asked about particular ingredients people find in their personal care products. One that has people especially confused lately is “sodium lauryl sulfate from coconut.”Many of you already know that regular sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) and sodium laureth sulfate (SLES) are harsh cleansers linked to skin irritation, allergic reactions, dermatitis, and dryness. Because consumers have become so savvy lately, cosmetics companies are trying to stay one step ahead of them without giving up their cheap, readily available ingredients.