Tag Archive: prevention

Time to Rethink Our Children’s Health

Time to Rethink Our Children’s Health

You may have noticed something different about children today: The vast majority seem to have some kind of diagnosed chronic illness such as ADHD, allergies, asthma, or autism. No matter how you look at it, our children are in trouble. Something is causing these varied symptoms in their bodies. If you look closely at these children’s symptoms (inattentive or hyperactive behaviors, skin rashes, gastrointestinal symptoms, sensory symptoms, breathing problems, learning disabilities, etc.) you will find that they all have common inflammatory roots.

Vitamin D

Studies Show Low Vitamin D Levels Linked to Cancer and Heart Disease

Two new studies indicate that low levels of vitamin D are linked to cancer, heart disease, and other illnesses — but only one offers enthusiastic support for supplementation in pill form. Both studies, published this month in the British Medical Journal (BMJ), were meta-analyses of earlier research that looked at the relationship between various illnesses and vitamin D levels, as well as whether taking a daily D supplement had a positive impact on health.

Angelina Jolie

Was Angelina Jolie “Medically Hexed?”

In this New York Times article, A-list actress Angelina Jolie bravely announced that she made the tough decision to undergo elective bilateral mastectomy after her doctors warned her that she has an 87% risk of developing breast cancer and a 50% risk of getting ovarian cancer because her mother died of breast cancer and she carries the BRCA1 gene. While I fully support Angelina’s right to write The Prescription for herself, and while I admire her courage to go public with what some might hide, as an OB/GYN physician with a passion for mind-body medicine, this breaking news concerns me for a variety of reasons.

Breast Cancer

Prevention is Key: 90% of Cancers Have No Family History

According to a new report, studies show that when women move to the United States from somewhere like Japan their risk of developing breast cancer increases. Genetics don’t change that quickly, only the environment does. Breast cancer cost more than $17 billion to treat in the United States last year alone. That number is four times bigger than the entire FDA budget for the year, and the disease was diagnosed in 227,000 women, killing 40,000.